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Purple Cape from Denise Shardlow

Wear the Rainbow: From Capes to Pendants at Denise Shardlow’s Open Studio on August 18th, 2017

Open Studio in Elkins Park August 18, 2017

Nutmeg Designs Feature Artist at Denise Shardlow Open Studio

 

Fashion Designer/Fiber Artist Denise Shardlow has invited Nutmeg Designs to be the feature artist at her Open Studio in Elkins Park. I will be there with mosaic pendants and a selection of other mosaics, and suncatchers by Stratoz. Her studio is an immersion in color with poppy red walls and anyone with an earthy orange living room is a Color Soul Sister! Denise has been busy making capes in a rainbow of colors out of scraps of melton wool.

Purple Cape from Denise Shardlow
Purple Cape in Melton Wool from Denise Shardlow

Mark your calendars for Friday Evening August 18th, 2017 from 5:30-9:00.  There will be wine from ONE Hope Wine with samples of their wines and a mission to benefit charities.

310 Sterling Road
Elkins Park, PA 19027

See Denise’s ERNSTdottir site for directions.

Open Studio Facebook Page

Margaret F. Crowther - Workshop on 3-D Forms

Margaret Crowther(1936-): Tapestry in 3D

 

Margaret F. Crowther - Workshop on 3-D Forms
Margaret F. Crowther – Workshop on 3-D Forms

Margaret Crowther(1936-), is a British textile artist who creates 3D tapestries by hand, many without a loom.  She knots and twists and builds up textures.  I am smitten with her use of orange, and color gradations, and the three dimensional levels.

Margaret Crowther, SOLSTICE, 110 x 150 x 12 cm, sisal, synthetic
©Margaret Crowther, SOLSTICE, 110 x 150 x 12 cm, sisal, synthetic

Margaret Crowther creates custom work for homes, and Sinead Lawler describes the process of commissioning a piece, conversations about colors and textures.  The artist created a special box (or as the author put it a “bespoke box”) for carrying it to the client’s home.

A Blue Sky Swirl by Margaret Almon
A Blue Sky Swirl by Margaret Almon, glass on slate, 7 inches.

I love to use levels in my own work, and the way they catch the light, and create a terrain.

Crochet Snowflake by Snowcatcher

A Welcome Snow: Snowcatcher’s Crochet Snowflakes and Fundraiser for MS

Crochet Snowflake by Snowcatcher
Snowcatcher’s Wonderful Crochet

 

Snowcatcher had her crocheted snowflakes featured in Art Forum Magazine, January 2014.  Her work is intricate and delightful.  Last year, a packet of snowflakes showed up in my mailbox, and Snowcatcher surprised me with more of them.  My favorite is the one with a star in the center and an orange border.

Snowcatcher raises money for the Colorado/Wyoming Chapter of the National MS Society by participating in their bike ride each June.  Read more about this event and the pdf booklet of crochet snowflake patterns that she is offering with donations.

 

Transformations Art and Craft Show 2013 Featured Artist: Amy Turner and her Weaving

Traditional wool rag rug by Amy Turner.
Traditional wool rag rug by Amy Turner.

Amy Turner grew up in an artistic household, with both parents accomplished painters, and her father had a large ceramics studio. She has been weaving for over 35 years. Her father gave her a loom when she was in high school and she has been weaving every since

 

Rayon shawl woven in lace weave with hand dyed yarns by Amy Turner.
Rayon shawl woven in lace weave with hand dyed yarns by Amy Turner.

She does all her weaving in her home studio in Doylestown, and has 5 looms, a spinning wheel, and an enormous collection of related equipment, yarns, spinning fibers and fabrics.

Rayon scarves with painted warp, tapestry inlay and beaded fringe by Amy Turner.
Rayon scarves with painted warp, tapestry inlay and beaded fringe by Amy Turner.

She combines traditional and contemporary styles, often with muted and neutral colors, using her own hand-spun yarn and hand-dyed fabrics.

Transformations 40th Annual Art and Craft Show, November 8-10, 2013, Hopewell Train Station, Hopewell, NJ.

Transformations Featured Artists:

Connie Bracci-McIndoe(pottery)

Susan Nadelson(hand dyed and handspun yarn)

Bernard Hohlfeld(artistic woodturner)

Ron Dombrowski(wood carving)

Sally Stang(pressed flower mosaic)

 

 

Transformations Art and Craft Show 2013
Transformations 40th Annual Art and Craft Show, November 8-10, 2013. Hopewell Train Station, NJ

 

 

Transformations Art and Craft Show 2013 Featured Artist: Susan Nadelson and her Hand Dyed, Handspun Yarn

 

Susan Nadelson Dyed Roving
Susan Nadelson Space Dyed Roving

Susan Nadelson loves texture and color, and she plays with their unlimited possibilities to create one-of-a-kind handspun yarn. To begin, she finds the softest fleeces from special breeds of sheep. She cleans them by hand, removing bits of twigs and hay, then washes the wool in hot water with gentle natural soap. While the fleece air dries, Susan selects mohair, silk, bamboo, and other luxurious fibers to combine with the sheep’s wool. She then chooses her color palette  and dyes each component separately. As she cards the wool and other fibers together the textures blend and the colors come alive.

Susan Nadelson Dyed Yarn
Susan Nadelson Space Dyed Yarn

Once she has found the perfect blend, she spins the fibers into yarn by hand. Each bundle of her yarn represents a unique exploration of texture and color inspired by the feel and hue of the natural world.

sweater hand spun and hand knit from space dyed yarn
Susan Nadelson sweater hand spun and hand knit from space dyed yarn

One of the pleasures of doing shows  is meeting talented makers of craft, and as a knitter, I am glad to be at close proximity to Susan’s vibrant yarn.

Susan Nadelson yarns and sweaters on display
Look forward to Susan Nadelson yarns and sweaters at Transformations.

Transformations 40th Annual Art and Craft Show, November 8-10, 2013, Hopewell Train Station, Hopewell, NJ.

Opening Reception Friday November 8th, 6-8 pm.

Transformations Featured Artists:

Connie Bracci-McIndoe(pottery)

Bernard Hohlfeld(artistic woodturning)

Amy Turner(weaving)

Ron Dombrowski(wood carving)

Sally Stang(pressed flower mosaic)

 

Transformations Art and Craft Show 2013
Transformations 40th Annual Art and Craft Show, November 8-10, 2013. Hopewell Train Station, NJ

 

Margarete von Brauchitsch(1873-1939): Embroiderer of Gorgeous Gridwork

 

Margarethe Von Brauchitsch, Tafeltuch, 1910
Margarethe Von Brauchitsch, Tafeltuch, 1910

 

 

 

The embroidery of Margarete Von Brauchitsch(1873-1939) reminds me of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Prairie Style Architecture, with stained glass made with an intricate grid  I had a chance to see Wright’s Dana-Thomas House when I lived in Illinois in 1994, and the delightful repetition of pattern was evident as it is Margarete Von Brauchitsch’s work.  John Hopper of the Design. Decoration. Craft blog gives the most information available not in German in his post Margarete Von Brauchitsch: A Modernist Designer.  Margarete created stained glass and tile in addition to embroidered linens, and had her own workshop with 16 employees.  She is not well known, which often is the case when I research intriguing Margaret’s.

Back Porch Dana-Thomas House via Becky Pitzer on Flickr.
Back Porch Dana-Thomas House via Becky Pitzer on Flickr.

Batik in Tanzania: Filex Jacobson Msalu

Madonna and Child, by Filex Msalu(2006), Batik, photo by Johan van Parys.
Madonna and Child, by Filex Msalu(2006), Batik, photo by Johan van Parys.

 

The blue glows as much as the warmer orange, in this portrayal of Madonna and Child by Tanzanian artist Filex Jacobson Msalu.  Batik is a process of applying wax and dye to fabric and then melting out the wax so more dye can be overlaid.   There is a burst of articles about him and his Sunshine Art Studio across from the Arusha Conference Center in Tanzania from 2005-2009, with details such as wanting to be an artist, and his father disowned him for refusing to become a driver or mechanic or something “useful,” then learning Batik, which was brought to Tanzania by Indonesian traders and missionaries.  A missionary inspired Filex to create traditional Biblical scenes with African settings.

I wanted to see what Filex is doing now, and could not find anything more recent than 2009.  There are still art galleries in Arusha, and classes tourists can take, but no mention of Filex.  I hope he is still making art.

Video of Filex Jacobson Msalu making Batik.

An Artist in Tanzania: Filex’s Batik Workshop

 

An Orange Snowflake from Snowcatcher

Crocheted Snowflake by Snowcatcher
Crocheted Snowflake by Snowcatcher

I received a package from Snowcatcher, and I found 6 crocheted snowflakes in an array of delicious coloration. What a wonderful surprise it was, since I wasn’t feeling well.  This one is perfect for Orange Tuesdays, and is more a “sunflake” than a snowflake.  Snowcatcher is a photographer of wildlife, a resident of Colorado, a maker of snowflakes and my number one commenter for 2012!   I encourage you to check out Snowcatcher’s blog and also support her ride for MS.

Fabric Topographies: The Textured Beauty of Kirsten Chursinoff’s Textile Art

Kirsten Chursinoff, Patina 2008, textile, thread, 21" X 17" framed
Kirsten Chursinoff, Patina 2008, textile, thread, 21″ X 17″ framed

My friend Di of The Kitchen Door sent me a link to Kirsten Chursinoff‘s textile art, introducing me to this Vancouver, BC artist, who has a lively color sense and incredible surface detail.  In her biography, Kirsten describes her involvement with needlework since the age of 5 when she embroidered her first iron-on transfer butterfly, which reminded me of my brief encounter with embroidery at age 9 or 10, and this very type of butterfly.  I found the process of transfer magical, ironing the white paper pattern, with its blue lines. I pored over the instructions, and reveled in the colors of embroidery floss, but the actual stitching was a struggle.

As a mosaicist, I am drawn to the texture of her work, because what first drew me to embroidery was  built up surfaces of  french knots and satin stitch.  Glass was to become my way of creating surface topography, and as much as I love it, there is still something intriguing about the suppleness of embroidery.  Kirsten combines free motion machine stitching with hand stitching and building up of layers and uses “secret ingredients” such as the bits of loose thread that tangle up along the raw edges of fabric when you wash it.

I also feel kinship with the improvisatory nature of Kirsten Chursinoff’s work:   “I never know exactly what a piece will look like until it is completed, but the anticipation continues to drives me forward.”  The iron-on butterfly of her childhood has lifted off into flights through flowers, and the beauties of the natural world.

More orange goodness on my Orange Tuesdays Pinterest Board.

 

 

Sheila Hicks: Fifty Years of Fabulous Fiber Art

Sheila Hicks. American,1934- Zapallar, 1957-58 wool 9 1/4″ x 4 3/4″ Private collection Photograph by: Bastiaan van den Berg

I have a fondness for orange combined with pink.  Pink is not my favorite color, so there must be something about orange that transforms it for me!

Chinese Coins Quilt Pattern in Mosaic
Chinese Coins Quilt Pattern in Mosaic by Margaret Almon

“Textiles had been relegated to a secondary role in our society, to a material that was either functional or decorative.  I wanted to give it another status and show what an artist can do with these incredible materials.”

-Sheila Hicks in a 2004 interview from Archives of American Art

Sheila Hicks. Sumo Balls. Photo: Massimo Vignelli Associates
Silky Rainforest. Sheila Hicks. Renwick Museum of Craft. Photo by Wayne Stratz.
Silky Rainforest. Sheila Hicks. Renwick Museum of Craft. Photo by Wayne Stratz.

I first saw a piece by Sheila Hicks while on vacation to DC, and the colors were mesmerizing.    It turns out she studied with painter Josef Albers at Yale, who was influential in color theory, and was friends with Anni Albers, fiber artist, and then she won a Fulbright to Chile to study weaving, and fiber and color became the essentials of her vision.  The Mint Museum of Craft & Design is hosting the exhibit Sheila Hicks: Fifty Years, until January 29, 2012.  I am also smitten that The Mint Museum has a Wiki created by their Library staff, with information about exhibits, which appeals to my librarian self.

What colors are transformed for you when put together?

 

More Orange Goodness at my Pinterest Orange Tuesdays Board.